Judge declares mistrial of Baltimore police officer in Freddie Gray case

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BALTIMORE, Md. – The judge has declared a mistrial in the case against a Baltimore police officer in the death of Freddie Gray.

Gray was arrested on April 12, and prosecutors say he suffered life-threatening injuries while in the back of a police van.

Riots broke out in Baltimore, Maryland, on April 27, 2015, following the funeral of Freddie Gray. Gray, an 25-year-old man, died in police custody on April 19 following an April 12 arrest.

Riots broke out in Baltimore, Maryland, on April 27, 2015, following the funeral of Freddie Gray. Gray, an 25-year-old man, died in police custody on April 19 following an April 12 arrest.

Authorities say Gray’s neck was broken while he was shackled and not wearing a seat belt.

He died a week later.

Prosecutors say William Porter, one of the officers in charge of the case, was asked by the van’s driver to check on Gray during stops on the way to the police station.

They say he should have called a medic for Gray sooner than one was eventually called and also should have ensured that Gray was wearing a seat belt.

Porter was charged with involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office.

Officer William Porter is one of six Baltimore, Maryland police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray. Gray was arrested by Baltimore police on April 12, 2015 and died on April 19. Porter is charged with involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault and misconduct in office.

Officer William Porter is one of six Baltimore, Maryland police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray. Gray was arrested by Baltimore police on April 12, 2015 and died on April 19. Porter is charged with involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault and misconduct in office.

For convictions on some or all of the first three charges, he would face no more than 10 years in prison combined. There is no statutory maximum sentence for the fourth charge, misconduct.

In all, six officers have been suspended.

On Wednesday, a judge declared a mistrial because the jury appeared to be hung.

According to NBC News, prosecutors considered Porter’s case to be the strongest and it was seen as a signal for how the trials of the other five officers could go.

The city of Baltimore said it activated its emergency operations center Monday “out of an abundance of caution.

Last week, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Kevin Davis cautioned the city to be respectful as the verdict gets closer.

“Whatever the jury decides, we must all respect the process,” the mayor said last week. “If some choose to demonstrate to express their opinion, that is their right, and we respect that right, and we will fight to protect it. But all of us today agree that the unrest from last spring is not acceptable.”

Protestors in Baltimore

All six officers are being tried separately and consecutively.

Next up is the van driver, Caesar Goodson, whose trial is set to begin next month.

Goodson, a black officer who is the lead defendant in the indictment, is charged with the most serious offense, that of second-degree murder with a depraved heart.