Weather Closings and Delays

Skeleton found beneath school may belong to 16th century pirate

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

NEWHAVEN, Scotland – Workers made a shocking discovery while trying to build an extension onto a primary school in Scotland.

Victoria Primary School is located in Newhaven, a former fishing village that is now part of Edinburgh.

When workers prepared to build an extension onto the school, they thought they may find the remnants of the original harbor and shipyard.

Instead, they found human remains.

Archaeologists carbon dated the skeleton to the 16th or 17th century. They say the remains are that of a man in his 50s, who was most likely a pirate or criminal.

Archeologists carbon dated a skeleton to the 16th or 17th century. They believe the remains belong to a man in his 50s, who was most likely a pirate or criminal. Forensic artist Hayley Fisher worked with AOC Archeology to create a facial reconstruction of the skull, allowing children at the school to get an idea of what the man buried beneath their school looked like.

Archeologists carbon dated a skeleton to the 16th or 17th century. They believe the remains belong to a man in his 50s, who was most likely a pirate or criminal. Forensic artist Hayley Fisher worked with AOC Archeology to create a facial reconstruction of the skull, allowing children at the school to get an idea of what the man buried beneath their school looked like.

Officials say the bones were found near the gallows in a shallow, unmarked grave, indicating he may have been publicly executed.

“Thanks to carbon dating techniques, archaeologists now know that the skeleton was likely to have been a murder victim — and quite possibly a pirate,” Councillor Richard Lewis, of Edinburgh’s City Council, said in a statement.

Officials say archaeologists will hold a lesson with the children attending the school so they can learn about how they use science to analyze remains.

 

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.