‘Riding The Whirlwind, Weather in the West’, KFOR a pioneer in Oklahoma weather coverage

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OKLAHOMA CITY-  The state of Oklahoma is ground zero for some of the wildest weather on earth. Tornadoes, flash floods, heat waves, and blizzards are some of the weather extremes that hit the Sooner state.

Starting Friday, February 5th, NewsChannel 4 and the 4 Warn Storm Team in partnership with the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum are proud to present Riding The Whirlwind, Weather in the West. This outstanding exhibit organized by the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, will help you learn how the often brutal environment of this region with its dramatic blizzards, violent thunderstorms, floods, droughts, tornadoes, and hurricanes has shaped and continues to shape, the history of the American West.

Discover how WKY TV 4 (now KFOR NewsChannel 4) was a severe weather broadcast pioneer and continues as the Weather Leader in Oklahoma today. You can be a 4 Warn forecaster when you step up in front of the green screen and try your hand at being a TV weathercaster. There are many interactive stations throughout the gallery and specially created for kids of all ages. Discover how doppler radar works and check out the tornado machine.

Find out how Native American tribes interpreted the weather and see incredible panoramas of weather in the west.

In addition to Ridin' The Whirlwind, Weather in the West, there are three other exhibitions showcasing the American West’s diverse history, artistry and evolving culture that continues to shape our nation today. “We’re very excited about these exhibitions as they offer the public an opportunity to experience and enjoy the West in several new ways,” said Museum President Steven Karr. “From Western fashion, weather and photography to well-known artists depicting the West’s rich sporting and wildlife culture, the Museum has something for everyone in early 2016.”

“We’re very excited about these exhibitions as they offer the public an opportunity to experience and enjoy the West in several new ways,” said Museum President Steven Karr. “From Western fashion, weather and photography to well-known artists depicting the West’s rich sporting and wildlife culture, the Museum has something for everyone in early 2016.”

Starting Friday, Feb. 5, 2016, the Native American Bolo Ties: Vintage and Contemporary Artistry exhibition will explore this uniquely Western sartorial adornment’s history and revival. The bolo ties included come from the Phoenix, Arizona, Heard Museum’s permanent collection of more than 170 bolo ties and from the promised gift of Chicago collector Norman L. Sandfield, whose collection consists of more than 1,000 bolo ties, scarf slides and ephemera. This exhibition is made possible by the Virginia M. Ullman Foundation, and organized by the Heard Museum.

The Cowboy Returns: Photographs by Bank and John Langmore is a nationally traveling exhibition, organized by the Briscoe Western Art Museum, San Antonio, Texas. The exhibit shows an intimate view of cowboys and their day-to-day lives over two generations in a collection of 100 black-and-white plus color photographs. The images depict the iconic cowboy’s gritty reality of working and living in the American West. The exhibit includes select works from Bank Langmore – considered a preeminent photographer of the American cowboy in the 1960s and 1970s – and his son, John Langmore, a celebrated artist in his own right, who spent the last three years photographing many of the same people and ranches his father documented more than 40 years ago. This exhibition runs from Friday, Feb. 5 through Sunday, May 8, 2016.

Beginning Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, Philip R. Goodwin: America’s Sporting & Wildlife Artist, A Private Collection will showcase Philip R. Goodwin’s art. Goodwin (1882-1935) studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, The Art Students League in New York City, the Drexel Institute in Philadelphia, as well as under famed illustrator Howard Pyle at the Howard Pyle School. At 22, in 1903, Goodwin illustrated Jack London’s Call of the Wild and later Theodore Roosevelt’s African Game Trails as well as posters, calendars and other advertisements. The exhibit is organized by the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in Canyon, Texas.

“These four exhibitions offer new storylines and experiences for Museum visitors through our mission of interpreting and preserving the evolving history and cultures of the American West,” Karr said. “This is an unmatched opportunity for visitors to enrich their understanding of Western heritage and culture – and find their place in the West.”

For more information about the Museum’s upcoming exhibitions, visit www.nationalcowboymuseum.org or call (405) 478-2250.

About the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

Nationally accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is located in Oklahoma City’s Adventure District at the junction of Interstates 44 and 35, the state’s exciting Adventure Road corridor. The Museum offers annual memberships beginning at just $40. For more information, visit www.nationalcowboymuseum.org. For high-resolution images related to the National Cowboy Museum or this event, visit http://nationalcowboymuseum.org/learn-discover/media-room/.

 

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