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He has a change of heart: Oklahoma lawmaker wants to spring forward and keep it that way

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OKLAHOMA - A lawmaker wants to do away with time change in Oklahoma.

Initially, Rep. Harold Wright introduced a bill to end daylight saving time.

It passed a house panel but, after people raised concern over it, he said he is now amending the bill to keep DST all year round.

When we spring our clocks forward in the spring, that means we lose an hour of daylight in the morning and gain an hour of light in the evening.

DST this year is March 13, and many Oklahomans are unhappy to spring forward.

"I work at a middle school, and just the way that the time change effects students alone," said Whitney Wortham. "It makes it very difficult on the teachers and the staff."

"It messes with your internal clock that's for sure," said Frances Odeh.

Health is one reason why Wright said he wants to get rid of time change.

"Some of the research indicates that there are more heart attacks and even accidents during that period of time when we change from daylight to central and vice versa," Wright said.

Most people NewsChannel 4 spoke with support Wright’s bill.

"Falling back in the fall always messes me up so bad, and I just assume it just stay that way as it is through the summer all year long," said Don Reynolds. "Then, you don't have to fool with doing the other thing, you know, getting all the clocks set."

"I think I would rather wake up in the dark and have my evenings with the sunlight," said Brooke Allen.

"It gives the kids time," said Ladonna Bruner. "They don't get out of school until like 3, and it gives them longer to play."

However, the idea is causing alarm for others.

"I think it would be weird to be at a different time than the rest of the time zone region," said Melaina Riley.

Wright said, after he amends his bill, it will head to the House for a vote.

Of the 50 states, most of Arizona and Hawaii do not have time changes.