Police: Data box proves Aubrey McClendon was excessively speeding moments before deadly crash

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma City police investigators released new information related to a crash that killed a well-known oil executive.

On March 2, one man died after his car slammed into the bridge near Midwest Blvd., between Memorial and 122nd St.

The Oklahoma City Police Department announced that the driver of that vehicle was Aubrey McClendon, the former CEO of Chesapeake.

The Oklahoma State Medical Examiner’s Office was able to use dental records to confirm McClendon’s identity.

The medical examiner’s office says McClendon died from multiple blunt force trauma.

However, McClendon’s manner of death and toxicology results are still pending.

On Monday, Chief Bill Citty, with the Oklahoma City Police Department released more information regarding the wreck.

Police say a data box from McClendon’s car registered that he was traveling at 88 miles per hour just five seconds before the crash.

The box also recorded that he went left of center 189 feet before the point of impact.

Investigators say McClendon maintained that speed of 88 miles per hour almost up until the time that he hit the bridge. At the point of impact, his car was traveling 78 miles per hour.

Citty says McClendon tapped his brakes several times before impact, but there were no skid marks left on the road.

“It didn’t really slow the vehicle down,” Citty said.

However, Citty says that McClendon let off the brake completely just before he hit the bridge.

After the news conference, American Energy Partners released the following statement.

“The police department’s courtesy and concern during this extremely difficult time has been greatly appreciated by Mr. McClendon’s family, co-workers and friends,” said spokesperson Renzi Stone.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.