States favoring gun owner rights tend to record more federal background checks

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New data from the FBI shows an interesting link between federal background screenings and whether states favor more rights for gun owners.

According to the data, states favoring rights for gun owners tend to perform more federal background screenings on people wanting to purchase firearms or apply for a gun permit.

On the other hand, the data suggests that states that do not favor gun ownership recorded fewer federal background screenings on gun buyers and permit applicants.

The information, which was published in an article by the Scripps Howard Foundation Wire, used 2015 FBI data of the number of background screenings on the list of the best states for gun owners in 2015, compiled by Guns and Ammo magazine.

The Guns and Ammo information is judged in five categories including:

  • The right to carry a gun
  • The right to purchase certain types of rifles

Currently, the FBI does background checks for the District of Columbia, five territories and 30 states. The other 20 states run their own background checks or complete them in cooperation with the FBI.

The FBI still compiles data from the states doing their own screenings, according to SHFWire.

Oklahoma ranked 30th in the U.S. for favorability to gun owners, according to Guns and Ammo. The Sooner State recorded 359,276 background checks per 100,000 people in 2015.

Oklahoma uses a “shall issue,” in which the authorities must grant a gun permit to anyone meeting the criteria of basic legal requirements. The state also recognizes permits from all other states and places no restrictions on firearms or magazines for tactical-looking weaponry.

In all, the FBI performed nearly 23 million firearm background checks in 2015.