State of emergency issued for Woods County as massive fire continues to burn

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WOODS COUNTY, Okla. – Firefighters are still tending to hot spots after a massive fire burned almost 400,000 acres across Oklahoma and Kansas.

By Monday afternoon, the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture said that the Anderson Creek fire was about 95 percent contained.

Credit: Oklahoma Forestry Services

Credit: Oklahoma Forestry Services

While it seems to be mostly under control, officials say weather conditions later this  week could help the remaining fires to spread.

Currently, a county burn ban is in place in Texas, Harper and Cimarron counties.

On Monday, Gov. Mary Fallin declared a state of emergency for Woods County.

The fire, which began last week in Oklahoma and spread north to Kansas, has been described as the largest fire in Kansas history.

Fire blackens ground northwest of Alva in this aerial photograph taken Thursday evening. A small plume of smoke remains of the huge fire that began near Camp Houston and traveled up to Comanche and Barber County, Kansas. This image was taken above the Oklahoma-Kansas border, southwest of Medicine Lodge and due north of Woodward. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Fire blackens ground northwest of Alva in this aerial photograph taken Thursday evening. A small plume of smoke remains of the huge fire that began near Camp Houston and traveled up to Comanche and Barber County, Kansas. This image was taken above the Oklahoma-Kansas border, southwest of Medicine Lodge and due north of Woodward. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Officials say the fire has also impacted livestock producers in the area, killing cattle and burning haybales  as the flames continue to spread.

Livestock producers who have been impacted by the fire are asked to call their county Farm Service Agency Office for assistance.

If you would like to help, online donations are being accepted and a hay donation repository has been established west of Alva.

To donate hay, contact Greg Highfill at (580) 430-6125 or the Wood County Extension office at (580) 327-2786.

Citizens are reminded to be very careful with any outdoor activity that might spark a blaze. Simple things like welding, grinding and charcoal grilling can ignite a fire in these conditions.