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How did a 500 square foot section of North Carolina basketball history end up in Moore, Oklahoma?

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MOORE, OKLAHOMA -- The place is Trifecta Communications.

This is there downstairs office where a lot of regular work goes on; some video editing, news gathering, advertising.

They do all that at the Old Moore School office park.

"We do a little bit of everything," says tech director Rob Morris.

Trifecta has offices upstairs too which is where this story gets interesting.

CEO Brent Wheelbarger inherited a chunk of history when he moved in here, a 500 square foot section of basketball floor.

But it's not just any basketball floor.

It's a piece of North Carolina history.

Mark says, "At first, when we realized what was up here, we all wanted to walk up here and touch it and everything."

The earlier tenants had it installed.

They were big basketball fans.

Now before you say, 'so what' you need to think about who walked here in sneakers too.

This floor is from the old Carmicheal Auditorium in Chapel Hill, the same floor Micheal Jordan played on for three years.

James Worthy played here as well as Phil Ford, Sam Perkins, and Kenny Smith.

Rob Morris still gets goosebumps.

"I grew up in South Carolina so I grew up an ACC fan," he says. "University of North Carolina, North Carolina State." "I literally got chills going down my spine."

They don't play much basketball in the office, but employees did fill out a few NCAA brackets.

As they do the real work of making money, the people here also take inspiration knowing that champions played here too.

Wheelbarger adds, "I think the fact that this floor is here is a wonderful metaphor for our company."

The analogies you can draw between basketball and business are just about endless.

Belive me when I say we talked them through.

But here we are, in Oklahoma on hallowed Tar Heel ground, hoping a little of that kind of success rubs off in some way.

Who knows?

It just might.

The previous office tenants had the floor installed a few years ago.

The floor was pulled up after the 1985 season when UNC opened the Dean Smith Dome.