El Reno schools looking to eBooks to save money

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EL RENO, Okla. -- In lieu of state budget cuts, schools all over Oklahoma are having to adjustment. Many schools are getting creative with how they save money.

"It's frustrating to have the budget cuts and not be able to have resources, but in another way it's almost been a blessing in disguise,” Monica Brower, principal of Leslie F. Roblyer Learning Center, said.

At Roblyer Learning Center, That disguise comes in the form of tablets and smart boards.

"With the budget cuts we really don't have the money. So, our teachers, staff all sat down and said okay what do we want this to look like. What do students need to know, learn and how do we want to accomplish that,” Brower said.

Straying away from textbooks, Brower says they’ve been using electronic materials which is actually cheaper than the books.

"That hurts us a little bit, especially with our parents who grew up with text books. But we're starting to evolve as a faculty and we have a great staff that look for ways to effect kids with you know the limited resources we have,” Craig McVay, superintendent for El Reno Public Schools, said.

Schools all over Oklahoma are having to make adjustments, a hot topic at this weekend’s Oklahoma State School Board Association conference.

"It's caused larger class sizes. It causes you to remove some programs that you might not want to, you keep the core programs intact,” John Tuttle with Kellyville Public Schools said.

"Most recently, we've made a tremendous change going to a four day school week,” Danny Fuller with Grand View Public Schools said.

While it’s tough, school officials, like Brower, say they’re making the most of it and utilizing the limited resources they do have.

"When we have to put away the textbooks, then we get more creative about what we're doing and the kids are loving coming to school and that's the most important part,” Brower said.