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Downtown Cushing shut down after 5.0 quake

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CUSHING, Okla. - Windows are being boarded up and glass is being swept up after a 5.0 earthquake hit Cushing.

The downtown area took the brunt of the force.

City leaders cordoned it off Sunday night but were letting some business owners in to assess the damage and start cleaning up.

"It's a mess," said Garry Smith, who has a booth in the antique store with his wife. "Our stuff's everywhere."

Some owners got up on the roofs of the old buildings and finished the job for Mother Nature, tossing down loose bricks.

The city used a drone to assess the damage from above.

Many in Cushing said the shaking was unlike any they've felt before.

"It felt like a plane was about to hit our house," said 6th grader, Adyn Spencer, who got an unexpected 3-day weekend when schools were closed for the day.

"It was just a big loud explosion, and it shook the whole house and the house just upheaved.  I thought the whole house was going to come down," said Mike Eubank.

Eubank's wife runs the Cushing Tag Agency.

Their building also sustained heavy damage, and they were looking to relocate Monday afternoon.

"There was some screaming, and there were some kids that were crying," said Ben Stokes.

Stokes was inside the movie theater watching Dr. Strange in 2D when it suddenly felt more like 4D.

"We heard the big boom, and then part of the ceiling up towards the screen fell down. And, after that, everyone was just running to get out, kind of a stampede."

City officials said 40-50 buildings sustained what they call "substantial damage."

They had to evacuate the Cimarron Tower, an assisted living facility home to about 50 people.

And, police and emergency managers said they will not open the downtown area again until structural engineers let them know it's safe.