Kingfisher County property owners worried about seismic testing

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KINGFISHER COUNTY, Okla. – A community wants answers about seismic activity testing they said has been disrupting their area.

"We somewhat feel our rights, as property owners, have been circumvented,” said Wesley Short.

Short owns 160 acres of land in Kingfisher County.

"Everything that happens out here affects us one way or the other, whether it's our groundwater or whatever,” Short said.

Recently, something has been disturbing Short and his neighbors.

"Right now, we're dealing with a seismic crew that's coming through and, normally, they have to get permission and do their due diligence to see what kind of factors they might be affecting by their seismic,” said owner of Allied Mineral Management Bryce Everett, who also lives in the area.

Everett said they’re normally given notice when this type of work is done in their community but, this time, that wasn’t the case.

"None of the landowners are getting paid like normal, and we're not quite sure if that is considered a mineral trespass or not on the mineral owners,” Everett said.

After reaching out to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission and the county, the group has been told the company has the proper permit to work in the area.

However, Short said some of the machinery cannot be used within 200 feet of a water well.

He claims they’ve been only 70 feet away from his well and others.

"We're afraid about having our drinking water comprised. And, our old farm house here is like 100 years old, and the basement and so forth is very old concrete,” Short said.

He said that’s why they are ready for some answers.

"We kind of feel like it's an invasion of our privacy or our property rights,” Short said.

Short said they are waiting for more details about the company and the work they’ve been doing from county commissioners.