Rocky Mountain National Park to expand Native American representation

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ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK - MAY 23: Cars drive down the Trail Ridge Road May 23, 2003 in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. The road was opened for the season May 23 after crews spent a month plowing through the 15-foot-deep snowdrifts. Rising to an altitude of 12,183 feet above sea level the road is the highest contiguous paved highway in the country. The park is anticipating It's third busiest weekend, next to the Fourth of July and Labor Day. (Photo by Kevin Moloney/Getty Images)

BOULDER, Colo. – Rocky Mountain National Park is expanding its representation of Native Americans with the help of indigenous-focused University of Colorado groups and tribal representatives.

The Daily Camera reports that meetings began in the fall to devise a plan to expand representation of indigenous people’s lives.

Tribal members from Wyoming and Oklahoma were able to attend, while members from Utah, Colorado and Montana tribes have upcoming meetings with park officials.

Ute, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche and other Native tribes lived in and traveled through the land that is now Rocky Mountain National Park.

Participants at the meetings agreed it’s crucial for Native Americans to have control over how their history is shared.