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“It’s a crime against our natural resources,” Game wardens on the hunt for poachers

WARNING: Some of the images in this story may be disturbing.

KINGFISHER COUNTY, Okla. – “The weather has been spectacular this year. It's allowed people to get out in the woods and spend a lot more time out there,” said Capt. Wade Farrar with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife and Conservation. “Which is great, but it also gives a lot more time for people to be out there to wreak havoc on our resources.”

There are more than a dozen cases of poaching in and around the metro and countless others across the state.

From hunters collecting buck heads to killing elk and calves, game wardens are cracking down.

“Some of those were shot on private land without permission,” said Farrar. “The deer that was dumped in the water was obviously not just a crime against wildlife, but it's a crime against our natural resources when you throw a dead critter inside a lake.”

That particular animal was poached on a nature preserve in Cherokee County.

Another case stems from Jackson County, where five Whitetail Deer Heads were discovered. Investigators say the suspect didn’t have a license or any other type of documentation.

But what exactly is poaching?

“That could escalate from hunting without a license all the way up to the case you mentioned, where somebody has killed the five deer and took their heads off with no license and no checking those deer in,” said Farrar.

Game wardens are also asking for help after a calf was found shot to death near Pryor.

“All wildlife crimes do carry time in jail. I mean, it could come to that,” said Farrar. “Most of the time, it's fine money, revocation of licenses.”

The Department of Wildlife and even communities are offering cash rewards for information that leads to poachers.

You can report violators here.