Study finds tardy Oklahoma workers cost the the state $156 million each year

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OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. – Research has found that Oklahomans who show up late to work are costing the Oklahoman economy $156 million  per year, coming out to almost $100 per per person.

The research, conducted by the mattress review site, Mattress Clarity asked 2,750 American employees about lateness in the workplace, and found that the average Oklahoma worker loses nine minutes per week to lateness.

“We know that lack of sleep can affect timeliness,” said Joe Aurer from Mattress Clarity. “So it’s really important to make getting those eight-or-so hours between the sheets a priority. When you feel well rested, you’re less likely to be late.”

Mattress Clarity also revealed that nationally, men are worse culprits than women when it comes to lateness, turning up, on average, 7.2 minutes late to work each week and women were slightly better at 6.4 minutes late per-week.

It also showed that, as a nation, we don’t really try and mask our lateness and only 1 in 10 Americans would try to sneak into the office and pretend they’re not late. Of those who said they would sneak in, 60% were men.

When asked if they would consider reporting a colleague who was continually late, 27% of respondents said that they would. The survey also revealed that 12% of Americans admitted that they would lie about their reason for being late.

When asked what excuses they’d use for being late; 49% said they’d say the traffic was bad, 14% would say their alarm didn’t go off, another 14% would lie and say they had a doctor’s appointment, 12% would say they were feeling sick, 10% would blame the children or family for ‘holding them up’ and 2% would blame their lateness on public transport for being cancelled.

For the full survey and an interactive info-graphic, visit their website here.