“I look forward to the marathon,” Curriculum teaching students why we Run to Remember

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OKLAHOMA CITY – Dozens of Oklahoma schools are not only preparing to take part in the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon, they are also answering the question “why we run” with the help of a unique curriculum developed by the Oklahoma City National Memorial.

“School can teach us a lot, especially when it comes to staying healthy and physical fitness. Our schools also teach us the history of our city and why we run the memorial marathon,” said Dr. Phillip McGhee with Integris Family Medicine.

The kids at Adams Elementary School are gearing up for the big race.

“My students meet once a week at the end of the day on a Friday. And we get together for nearly half an hour to meet and discuss the curriculum and then we start running,” said Adams Elementary Coach Tara Light. “The curriculum that was sent to us has so much information. There’s so many great discussions starters that prompt conversation between all of our students.”

Not only are the students learning about staying healthy, but the importance of why we run to remember.

“The lesson about today was about how they came to the bombing instead of running away,” said Kids Marathon Runner Brookelynne Wesley.

“At first I couldn’t even run the complete mile on the first day, and now I can run one mile plus. You keep on building up your cardio to where you can run more and more so you can become more and more healthy,” said Hayden Barrowman, who is also running in the Kids Marathon.

“When I was running, my goal was not to stop. I look forward to the marathon. It makes me healthy and I get energetic,” said another Kids Marathon Runner, Kane Jameson-Birden.

“The kids track how many laps they can make in the gym. There are so many things that happen in our world today where the focus is on the horror and on the negative. Our curriculum and the day of the race and the museum itself flips that on its head and it celebrates life and courage and empowerment,” said Light. “The marathon itself teaches you that you can do something. If you can run that race you can get through any other hardship.”

For more information on the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon, click here.

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