Officials meet with residents impacted by NW Oklahoma City crude oil spill

OKLAHOMA CITY - Clean-up efforts continue at a northwest Oklahoma City neighborhood following a crude oil spill.

Officials from the Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) were on site Wednesday with their field inspectors, along with more than 170 environmental professionals, trying to make sure the oil is completely cleaned up.

OCC representatives also met with residents in the SilverHawk neighborhood Wednesday night to answer questions about Thursday’s oil spill that sent as much as 15 barrels of oil air born, settling down on more than 220 houses and lawns.

"We're here to answer and provide information and make sure communication is open," said Dana Murphy with OCC.

Not just immediate concerns, but long-term effects of the spill were on the minds of homeowners.

"They are also concerned about long-term value of the home, potentially having to disclose that if you sell your home, it could effect the value of the home," said Chris Painter, SilverHawk HOA President.

Wednesday, crews continued to power wash homes in the neighborhood. A representative from Sunoco was also on-hand, holding an open house to field questions and concerns from homeowners.

"We are letting them know that we are doing air samples, soil samples, everything to make sure that they are safe, their children are safe, and everything is cleaned up and taken care of," said Lisa Dillinger with Sunoco.

"There had been a lot of communication gaps and it was good to just walk up to them and ask them directly what's going on," said SilverHawk homeowner Deepak.

But, Deepak was still left with questions and wondering why an independent third party testing firm won't be used.

“How do I know if it's clean or not? Whether everything is back safe or not? If I chose a third party, then I have to do it out of my pocket," Deepak said.

OCC officials say the complete report on the spill will be out soon, along with the environmental impact information.