Oklahoma lawmaker calling for special session to ‘protect the will of the people’ on medical marijuana

OKLAHOMA CITY – An Oklahoma lawmaker is calling for a special session after a controversial announcement by the Oklahoma State Department of Health.

On Tuesday, the Board of Health approved emergency rules on medical marijuana, with some two specific exceptions.

Under the new emergency rules, smokable forms of medical marijuana would be banned from sale in dispensaries. According to Interim Health Commissioner Tom Bates, licensed medical marijuana users would still be allowed to use it if it was grown themselves.

"To allow smokable forms would be a step back as protectors of public health in Oklahoma and certainly reasonable people can differ on that," Commissioner Bates said.

The board also approved an amendment which would require pharmacists to be on site at dispensaries.

Bud Scott, executive director of New Health Solutions Oklahoma, told News 4 the amendments would "hamper" patient access.

"No smokable product, which basically eliminates flowering bud," he said. "That’s a major, major problem because often times different delivery systems, the way you ingest medical cannabis, has a different impact for your specific medical condition."

Now, an Oklahoma lawmaker is calling for a special session to "protect the will of the people."

On Tuesday afternoon, Rep. Jason Lowe, D- Oklahoma City, released the following statement regarding the new rules:

“The Oklahoma State Department of Health has enacted law that undermines one of the most participated in elections in state history and silences the voice of Oklahomans across this state. Today’s decision is an affront to democracy and an insult to the law-abiding citizens that showed up to vote for this initiative. In order to ensure that the will of the people is protected from bureaucracy and to save the state from yet another embarrassing lawsuit, I am calling on the governor to immediately call for a special session so that the elected leaders of this state can implement the law as instructed by the citizens of Oklahoma.”