Crowded classrooms come as a shock to some at Moore High School

MOORE, Okla. - A big problem for one metro school.  A crowded classroom at Moore High school.

The district did confirm that the high school had one classroom with at least 43 students.

The news is not shocking Ron Freeman, a retired teacher.

“The more students you have in class, the more problems you have,” said Freeman.

Freeman knows a thing or two about classroom sizes.

“I was some class, PE classes that had you know 90 plus, so that`s a lot of kids and you have to oversee them all,” said Freeman.

Freeman's not surprised to hear that Moore high school has a classroom with well over 40 students.

“It`s been an oncoming problem for a long time here in Oklahoma because our salaries haven`t increased and haven`t kept up with the states around us,” said Freeman.

A district spokesperson said in statement,

“At the beginning of each school year, if a class is over capacity then immediate measures are made to reduce the class size. This is done by placing students in other classes with lower enrollment and/or creating additional classes as needed. This practice is standard not only for Moore Public Schools but for many districts throughout the state. The first few days of the new school year can be stressful as we are still finalizing schedules to ensure graduation requirements are met and students are in courses that meet their interests and long-term goals. One of our goals throughout MPS is to reduce class sizes to provide a healthier and more conducive environment for learning,” said Dustin Horstkoetter with Moore Public Schools.

However, it can be hard on everyone involved.

“It affects everybody, it affects the teachers, it affects the students, it affects the school,” said Freeman.

Horstkoetter said the schools could typically see larger class sizes during the beginning of the school year.

And if a class is over capacity school administrators take immediate measures by placing students in other classes with lower enrollment or creating additional classes.

“You`re going to have to put those students somewhere with a teacher and what happens is the class level keeps getting bigger and bigger,” said Freeman.

The district tells us the class should get back down to normal capacity by the end of this week.