Oklahoma man could face charges after illegally shooting deer with bow hours before archery hunting season began

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NOBLE, Okla. – A man could face charges after illegally shooting a deer with a bow just hours before archery hunting season officially began.

"We start usually about a month ahead of the season, and it continues on sometimes a month or two after the season's over," Captain Wade Farrar, an Oklahoma game warden, told News 4.

Farrar is talking about poaching.

In a case on September 30, it wasn't a month or even a few weeks before archery hunting season. It was only a matter of hours.

“We got a tip from social media that a man had posted a deer that had been shot on September 30, the evening of September 30, so it would have been a few hours before the season actually started,” Farrar said.

The man allegedly shot a buck with a bow in Cleveland County.

“My guys went to investigate yesterday. The man claimed that he had shot the deer that morning and that he had checked the deer in online that morning. But, all the facts pointed that it was killed the night before,” Farrar said.

The case leads authorities to some important, seasonal reminders.

"Game wardens, our main goal is to enforce the fish and wildlife laws. Our goal, when we come to work every day, is to make sure that future generations have the same opportunities to hunt and fish that we've had," Farrar said.

In order for that to happen, game wardens said hunters need to abide by the law. For example, waiting until October 1 to hunt deer with a bow and November 17 to hunt with a rifle.

"When you go out there and your goal is to break the law, our job is to be there to stop you. And, of course, there are ramifications of that, be it a fine or jail time," Farrar said.

Farrar said the district attorney has not yet filed charges, which is why News 4 is not naming the suspect at this time.

Farrar said the man could face thousands of dollars in fines and up to 30 days in jail, depending on the charge.

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