Families, friends of missing loved ones seeking answers during annual event

EDMOND, Okla. - Families and friends who are still searching for answers after loved ones disappeared gathered together for 'Oklahoma Missing Persons Day.'

Hundreds of people right here in Oklahoma are still without answers after their loved ones vanished without a trace.

"There are literally hundreds of cases out there but given the advances in science and DNA, we can now get back into those cases and hold people responsible for the crimes that they've committed," said Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter.

Those attending Oklahoma Missing Persons Day at UCO provided photographs, dental records and DNA samples in hopes that one clue will solve their case.

"We`re not just looking at our cases, we're asking for our law enforcement partners across the state to get with us and partner with us, so we can try to help them with their cases. At the end of the day it's all of us working together to solve these crimes," said OSBI Director Ricky Adams.

Vicki Frost Curl's mother, Francine Frost, disappeared from a Tulsa grocery store in 1981, but it wasn't until 2014 that her family was finally matched to her remains.

"My son found a NAMUS report on the internet and linked the missing report and the unidentified remains together," Vicki Frost Curl said.

Now, she has made it her mission to help other families reunite with their missing loved ones. She is working with lawmakers to create Francine's Law, which would require all law enforcement, medical examiners and coroners to enter missing persons information into the NAMUS database.

"This is my passion. To see this law passed in her honor and in her memory. And for missing persons` families in Oklahoma," she said.

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