Moore Public School District announces plan to give teachers a $2,000 pay raise

MOORE, Okla. – While summer is just weeks away, some teachers are already looking forward to next year.

On Wednesday, officials with the Moore Public School District announced that they are planning to give teachers a pay raise next year.

“We are excited to announce that upon board approval, a salary increase of $3,220 will be added at each step which is comprised of $2,000 from the District plus $1,220 as suggested by the Oklahoma Legislature. The pay increase will be effective for the 2019-2020 school year,” a note by the district read.

Officials say that means that the starting base salary for teachers in Moore will be $40,608. They say the district will continue to be competitive in the state regarding teacher compensation and benefits.

“The much-deserved increase will help us retain and recruit quality educators. Our focus and efforts remain on increasing student achievement, improving workplace quality, increasing compensation and providing an impressive benefits package. Many thanks to our educators and negotiation teams for their dedication to our students and schools,” said Moore Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Robert Romines.

Last year, then-Gov. Mary Fallin signed a bill that raised teachers’ salaries by an average of $6,100. It also gave $1,250 raises to support staff.

One year later, Gov. Kevin Stitt encouraged lawmakers to come up with a way to fund a $1,200 pay raise for educators during his State of the State address.

Last month, the Oklahoma State School Boards Association said the latest findings are showing that the state is making progress when it comes to teacher pay.

Officials say Oklahoma’s gross average teacher salary is estimated to be about $52,400, compared to the $46,300 it was a year ago.

Oklahoma’s average teacher salary is now third in the region behind Texas and Colorado.

According to the National Education Association, Oklahoma was ranked 34th nationally in teacher pay. It is a drastic increase from last year’s 49th ranking.

The NEA bases its report on gross salary for classroom teachers before deductions for Social Security, retirement and health insurance.

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