Trump signs, tweets on $19B disaster relief package for 6 states; no mention of Oklahoma

(CNN) — President Donald Trump on Thursday signed a $19.1 billion disaster aid bill after delays stalled the measure from getting passed.

Trump wrote on Twitter he’d signed the measure and included a photo that appears to have been taken aboard Air Force One.

“Just signed Disaster Aid Bill to help Americans who have been hit by recent catastrophic storms,” Trump tweeted. “So important for our GREAT American farmers and ranchers. Help for GA, FL, IA, NE, NC, and CA.”

While Oklahoma was not mentioned in the tweet, Senator Lankford says this bill does include flooded areas in Oklahoma.

“The bill includes necessary funding to aid those who were already impacted by storms and the thousands more who are now watching flood waters rise.  In the future, Congress should include additional yearly funding into the annual FEMA budget to make disaster assistance more transparent and predictable,” said Lankford.

The President approved Oklahoma’s Disaster Declaration June 2, which makes Federal funding available to affected individuals in Muskogee, Tulsa, and Wagoner counties.

“Federal funding also is available to State, tribal, and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for debris removal and emergency protective measures, including direct Federal assistance, in the counties of Muskogee, Tulsa, and Wagoner.

Emergency protective measures, limited to direct federal assistance, will be provided in the counties of Haskell, Kay, Le Flore, Noble, Osage, Pawnee, and Sequoyah.”

Click here to read the full release.

Trump also insisted that Puerto Rico should be pleased with him for approving the bill, despite criticism from the island that he hasn’t done enough in helping recovery efforts after Hurricane Maria.

“Puerto Rico should love President Trump. Without me, they would have been shut out!” he wrote.

The bill will bring much-needed relief to Americans affected by hurricanes, floods, wildfires, and other disasters.

A handful of House Republicans, arguing that the full House of Representatives should be present to take a roll call vote, rather than attempting to move the bill while lawmakers were not in Washington, held up passage of the measure last month after the Senate passed the bill. It ultimately passed the House on Monday.

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