Study: Sleep affected by smoking, vaping, OSU researchers say

STILLWATER, Okla. – Researchers at Oklahoma State University say a recent study among college students showed the effects cigarettes and e-cigarettes can have on sleep.

Researchers at OSU’s Behavior Change Lab surveyed 1,664 college students; 41 percent reported trying or currently using e-cigarettes while 29 percent reported trying or currently using traditional cigarettes.

According to researchers, the study determined that sleep scores “were poor across the board, but smokers and vapers faired worse, with the latter reporting more prevalent use of sleep medications.”

“We know that with some of the e-cig research that’s coming out that students have wide ranges of perceptions about how harmful they might be,” said Dr. Emma Brett, one of the researchers who worked on the study. “The idea is if we know some of those effects and can incorporate them into prevention and intervention efforts, not using scare tactics but giving people the full picture, hopefully we can correct some of those perceptions so at least people are informed about the risks.”

Last week, a sixth person in the United States died from lung disease related to vaping, Kansas health officials said.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the FDA and state health departments have been investigating the outbreak. Health officials say they haven’t found a definitive cause or a clear connection between cases, but some are zeroing in on potential clues.

Also last week, President Donald Trump said that the US Food and Drug Administration would be putting out “some very strong recommendations” regarding the use of flavored e-cigarettes in “a couple of weeks.”

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