Lawsuit filed to stop Permitless Carry law before November 1

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OKLAHOMA CITY - Gun control advocates are gearing up for the constitutional carry law that takes effect November 1.

New stickers have been placed in some OKC business windows, but more importantly, a 35-page lawsuit was filed in Oklahoma County court on Monday against Governor Kevin Stitt.

"We're excited to bring this lawsuit. We're excited to challenge this dangerous law," said Jason Lowe, State Representative from District 97.

Lowe is one of five plaintiffs in the petition.

The suit claims the new law is in violation of the "single-subject rule."

They say HB 2597 deals with other weapons than just firearms, like brass knuckles, and carries the laws into multiple places like school parking lots.

"People would be allowed to carry a gun with no license in a public park while my kids play sports. I don’t think that is a good idea," said plaintiff Amanda Bryant.

"We knew that they were going to attempt some other 'hail mary' to stop constitutional carry, to go against the will of the people, the will of the legislature and the will of the Governor," said Don Spencer.

The president of the Oklahoma 2nd Amendment Association helped write the bill. He says the other gun laws have multiple sections that interact to make them work.

Plaintiffs in the case say the law is not just poorly written but it was also penned by the wrong people.

"That’s what happens when you allow people like the head of OK2A to write legislation that our legislators just rubber stamp. We don’t have legislators writing these laws we have gun extremists so that’s one reason why we are challenging today," said plaintiff Andrea Stone.

"I respond to that as absolute ignorance. Any person can identify a problem with the law offer suggestion for the law and support for the law your free speech is there to do exactly that. It doesn’t surprise me that the same group that doesn’t want you to exercise a 2nd amendment right would not want u to exercise a 1st amendment right," said Spencer.

Both the Governor’s office and the State Attorney General's office say they are reviewing the lawsuit.

Lowe says he has also filed for an injunction to stop the bill from taking effect November 1.

An initial hearing has been scheduled for October 30th.

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