Second Amendment activist plans to sue after he couldn’t carry gun at Tulsa park

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TULSA, Okla. (KFOR) - A Second Amendment activist says he plans to file a lawsuit after he was kept out of a park in Tulsa.

Don Spencer had a camera rolling as he tried to get into Oktoberfest in Tulsa last week with his gun and concealed carry license.

Tulsa police wouldn't let him in.

"One person comes over and basically tells me he's going to arrest me if I don't leave. Then he committed battery on me, forcing me out and told me he did me a favor for letting me go. He told me I couldn't come back on the property or I'd be arrested again​," Spencer said.

Spencer plans to file a lawsuit, claiming police violated his rights.

He says he had no problem carrying a gun at Scissortail Park last month at the Kings of Leon concert.

"I simply walked up, presented my valid SDA license. They looked at it, and I was allowed in without any problems. The exact same thing should have taken place on the public trust property of the Tulsa River Park Authority," Spencer said.

But the Park Authority says that's not true.

The executive director told Tulsa World that Oktoberfest is a ticketed and gated private event, so organizers can set their own rules.

Spencer disagrees, but has the following advice as gun laws loosen next week.

​"You need to learn where you can and cannot carry. If you were to enter say a college property or high school property, you'd be committing a misdemeanor crime​," Spencer said.

Permitless carry goes into effect November 1.

You can still obtain a license through the OSBI, and you'll need one if you plan to travel to a state where a permit is required for either open or concealed carry.

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