OK Co. Sheriff’s Office discusses plans to move operations out of jail with advisory committee

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OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) — Representatives from the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office presented details about a potential new location for the OCSO to the Public Building Advisory Committee on Monday.

Officials with the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office are discussing potential plans to move their operations from the Oklahoma County Jail to a building formally known as the Krowse Army Reserve Center at NE 36th and MLK, which is already owned by the county.

Officials presented some information, including the layout of the building, to the Public Building Advisory Committee on Monday.

"From many of the buildings we've kind of started to look at, this one fits our needs perfectly. It has the perfect amount of space," Mark Myers, a spokesperson for the Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office, said.

Myers said the space is large enough that the building could house other county agencies, like emergency management, and parts of the building could be rented out to other tenants as well.

"Now, comes the hard part. We have to put our numbers together. Make sure our I's are dotted and our T's are crossed," Myers said.

The PBA committee asked the OCSO to calculate how much it will cost to relocate to the Krowse building and then let them know when those numbers are ready. At that point, they will call a special meeting to discuss the cost or discuss it at their next scheduled meeting in November.

As far as the timeline of the move, the clock is ticking. Last week, Sheriff P.D. Taylor has said he would like to be moved out of the jail by January 1, 2020.

"I don't know if the jail trust or not would have wanted him to relocate, they might've. But, this is his wish," District 2 County Commissioner Brian Maughan said.

How operations of the jail will look going forward, including a possible new jail administrator, is still up in the air.

"The Jail Trust hasn't voted to do that. They've signaled they're going to do that by posting a job for a jail administrator," Maughan said.

So for now, the future of operations at the jail is unclear.

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