Oklahoma man pleads guilty in federal murder-for-hire case

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – A man accused of trying to hire someone to kill a former employee and lover, as well as her boyfriend, pleaded guilty in federal court on Wednesday.

On April 17, 70-year-old Vernon Brock, of Alva, was indicted by a federal grand jury on one count of using interstate commerce facilities in the commission of murder-for-hire.

Brock was the co-owner of Big E Vapor Shops, which has 17 stores in Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. However, Brock was removed as a co-owner, and no longer has ties to the company.

According to an affidavit, Brock approached a Kansas business associate, asking him to find someone to murder an Oklahoma City woman and her boyfriend, as the man is a “member of an outlaw motorcycle gang” and “hangs out with a ‘rough crowd,'” believing the associate could find someone to commit the murder.

The woman is a former vape shop employee and was previously in a relationship with Brock.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office says Brock offered the business associate $5,000 to arrange the murder.

The business associate contacted the FBI on March 29 after ignoring Brock’s request for several weeks, saying Brock became more insistent.

FBI agents recorded three phone calls between the associate and Brock between April 1 and April 2.

“I’d rather do him, thump her and I mean thump her hard. And tell her if she says one word to the cops about anything there will be someone come back (sic) to get her and her kids,” Brock allegedly said on a recorded phone call discussing the killing of the woman’s boyfriend. “He’s the one I want.”

Brock was arrested on April 3 after delivering the $5,000 check to the business associate in Kansas.

On Wednesday, Brock pleaded guilty to the one-count indictment and admitted that he traveled in interstate commerce on April 1, and used facilities of interstate commerce- a cell phone and a pickup truck- with the intent that murder be committed in exchange for payment.

He faces up to 10 years in prison, a fine of $250,000 and three years of supervised release.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office says sentencing takes place in approximately 90 days.

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