Oklahoma tribes with casinos say no to compact arbitration

TULSA, Okla. (AP) – Oklahoma’s 35 tribal nations with casinos have rejected arbitration in a dispute with the state over whether existing gaming compacts automatically renew at the end of the year.

The Tulsa World reports that the tribes say in a letter to state Attorney General Mike Hunter that they remain unified in the belief the compacts renew.

Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt has said the 15-year-old compacts expire at the end of the year and wants to renegotiate them to give the state a larger share of casino revenue.

The tribes pay fees of between 4% and 10% of a casino’s net revenue and receive exclusive rights to operate casinos in the state.

The fees generated nearly $139 million for the state last year.

Stitt spokeswoman Baylee Lakey said the governor is disappointed the tribes declined arbitration. Hunter’s office declined to┬ácomment.

Hunter met with representatives from 31 tribes across the state about the gaming compacts October 28.

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