ATLANTIC CITY, New Jersey (KFOR/Storyful) – An environmental group in New Jersey is blaming offshore wind industry companies for the deaths of 6 young whales over a span of 33 days in December and January.

Clean Ocean Action (COA) is calling for the Biden administration to immediately halt “offshore wind pre-construction activity,” and to conduct “an immediate and fully transparent investigation into the recent whale deaths by federal agencies mandated by law to protect marine mammals, especially endangered species.”

The whales and one dolphin washed ashore along beaches in New York and New Jersey. The latest whale, as seen in the video at the top of this story, was a 30-foot humpback whale, according to the City of Atlantic City, which washed ashore on Georgia Avenue Beach.

“The Marine Mammal Stranding Center was immediately notified. Upon arrival, MMSC crews took the initial samples,” the agency posted on Facebook, writing that more tests will be conducted.

“The wave of dead whales is the ocean sounding the alarm and we must heed the warning. These tragic multiple deaths of mostly young, endangered whales are of no apparent cause. However, the only new activity in the ocean is the unprecedented concurrent industrial activity by over 11 companies in the region’s ocean, which allows the harassment and harm of tens of thousands of marine mammals,” Cindy Zipf, Executive Director of Clean Ocean Action, stated in a press release.

The press release goes on to state that wind energy survey boats emit high frequency pulses of sound to map the ocean floor. The COA claims, “Use of sonar at higher levels has been known to have harmful impacts on whales, including deafening, which can lead to starvation and death.”

“These tragic multiple deaths of mostly young, endangered whales are of no apparent cause, however, the only new activity in the ocean is the unprecedented concurrent industrial activity by over 11companies in the region’s ocean, which allows the harassment and harm of tens of thousands of marine mammals. Moreover, federal and state agencies have been recklessly fast-tracking offshore wind development projects. These three coinciding factors raise suspicions, and a responsible and reasonable response is the action plan for which we are calling,” Zipf stated.

However, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has conducted investigations into 174 whale deaths since 2016, and according to NJ.com, necropsies were administered on about half. Of those, NOAA said the deaths at that time were not due to offshore wind activities.

Read more on Clean Ocean Action’s efforts here.