Strong COVID-19 surge continues in Oklahoma with record high 23 more virus-related deaths and 2,847 new cases

Coronavirus

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – COVID-19 continues surging in Oklahoma, as the Oklahoma State Department of Health reported on Saturday a record high of 23 more deaths from the virus, as well as 2,847 new cases.

OSDH reports that there have now been 150,205 COVID-19 cases in Oklahoma since the pandemic began in March.

The Department of Health reported on Friday that there were 147,358 cases since March.

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Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health

Oklahoma set a massive record high last Saturday with 4,741 new COVID-19 cases.

With 23 more deaths reported, the COVID-19 death toll has climbed to 1,516 deaths since March.

The previous record high for new deaths was the 22 deaths OSDH reported on Oct. 27. Since that day, there have been several days in which high deaths numbers were reported, including 20 deaths reported on both Oct. 29 and Oct. 30, 21 deaths reported on both Nov. 3 and Nov. 5 and 19 deaths reported Nov. 11.

There are currently 25,356 active COVID-19 cases in the state, 1,265 more active cases than on Friday, a 5.3 percent increase.

Officials have not released the most up-to-date number of COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state.

OSDH reported that there were 1,279 people in Oklahoma hospitals with confirmed and suspected cases of COVID-19 on Friday.

Officials reported Saturday that 123,333 people have recovered from COVID-19 in Oklahoma since March.

Here is the breakdown of COVID-19 cases in Oklahoma counties:

  • Adair: 1,038 (13 deaths) (777 recovered)
  • Alfalfa: 164 (139 recovered)
  • Atoka: 602 (1 death) (478 recovered)
  • Beaver: 132 (1 death) (97 recovered)
  • Beckham: 1,059 (16 deaths) (922 recovered)
  • Blaine: 275 (2 deaths) (231 recovered)
  • Bryan: 2,262 (17 deaths) (1,708 recovered)
  • Caddo: 1,400 (27 deaths) (1,161 recovered)
  • Canadian: 5,230 (24 deaths) (4,274 recovered)
  • Carter: 1,177 (13 deaths) (928 recovered)
  • Cherokee: 1,771 (10 deaths) (1,400 recovered)
  • Choctaw: 574 (2 deaths) (486 recovered)
  • Cimarron: 55 (39 recovered)
  • Cleveland: 10,291 (116 deaths) (8,613 recovered)
  • Coal: 211 (122 recovered)
  • Comanche: 3,419 (26 deaths) (2,706 recovered)
  • Cotton: 140 (3 deaths) (108 recovered)
  • Craig: 772 (2 deaths) (651 recovered)
  • Creek: 1,999 (41 deaths) (1,655 recovered)
  • Custer: 1,387 (11 deaths) (1,145 recovered)
  • Delaware: 1,595 (31 deaths) (1,285 recovered)
  • Dewey: 127 (1 death) (94 recovered)
  • Ellis: 69 (38 recovered)
  • Garfield: 2,960 (33 deaths) (2,518 recovered)
  • Garvin: 1,154 (8 deaths) (829 recovered)
  • Grady: 2,053 (19 deaths) (1,713 recovered)
  • Grant: 157 (3 deaths) (125 recovered)
  • Greer: 195 (8 deaths) (150 recovered)
  • Harmon: 91 (76 recovered)
  • Harper: 107 (2 deaths) (79 recovered)
  • Haskell: 535 (5 deaths) (414 recovered)
  • Hughes: 494 (7 deaths) (415 recovered)
  • Jackson: 1,475 (20 deaths) (1,184 recovered)
  • Jefferson: 120 (1 death) (86 recovered)
  • Johnston: 414 (4 deaths) (313 recovered)
  • Kay: 1,214 (20 deaths) (945 recovered)
  • Kingfisher: 692 (6 deaths) (594 recovered)
  • Kiowa: 248 (5 deaths) (189 recovered)
  • Latimer: 270 (3 deaths) (226 recovered)
  • Le Flore: 1,984 (25 deaths) (1,756 recovered)
  • Lincoln: 1,029 (23 deaths) (837 recovered)
  • Logan: 1,061 (3 deaths) (907 recovered)
  • Love: 384 (1 death) (303 recovered)
  • Major: 304 (2 death) (219 recovered)
  • Marshall: 485 (2 deaths) (332 recovered)
  • Mayes: 1,212 (17 deaths) (976 recovered)
  • McClain: 1,849 (16 deaths) (1,430 recovered)
  • McCurtain: 1,938 (42 deaths) (1,612 recovered)
  • McIntosh: 649 (12 deaths) (525 recovered)
  • Murray: 446 (3 deaths) (343 recovered)
  • Muskogee: 3,180 (29 deaths) (2,401 recovered)
  • Noble: 306 (3 deaths) (217 recovered)
  • Nowata: 333 (4 deaths) (272 recovered)
  • Okfuskee: 734 (11 deaths) (558 recovered)
  • Oklahoma: 30,228 (260 deaths) (24,325 recovered)
  • Okmulgee: 1,520 (15 deaths) (1,281 recovered)
  • Osage: 1,647 (17 deaths) (1,423 recovered)
  • Other: 39 (1 recovered)
  • Ottawa: 1,459 (22 deaths) (1,284 recovered)
  • Pawnee: 425 (5 deaths) (351 recovered)
  • Payne: 3,413 (16 deaths) (2,929 recovered)
  • Pittsburg: 1,558 (21 deaths) (1,299 recovered)
  • Pontotoc: 1,372 (8 deaths) (949 recovered)
  • Pottawatomie: 2,709 (21 deaths) (2,336 recovered)
  • Pushmataha: 355 (6 deaths) (299 recovered)
  • Roger Mills: 111 (5 deaths) (83 recovered)
  • Rogers: 3,141 (57 deaths) (2,557 recovered)
  • Seminole: 1,058 (8 deaths) (854 recovered)
  • Sequoyah: 1,552 (14 deaths) (1,274 recovered)
  • Stephens: 1,116 (11 deaths) (834 recovered)
  • Texas: 2,072 (11 deaths) (1,862 recovered)
  • Tillman: 231 (4 deaths) (165 recovered)
  • Tulsa: 26,430 (235 deaths) (22,507recovered)
  • Wagoner: 2,248 (34 deaths) (1,994 recovered)
  • Washington: 1,605 (43 deaths) (1,383 recovered)
  • Washita: 252 (2 deaths) (192 recovered)
  • Woods: 291 (1 death) (209 recovered)
  • Woodward: 1,513 (6 deaths) (1,341 recovered)
Face masks
Via Unsplash

The state’s COVID-19 Alert System recently classified Oklahoma County as a Red Zone, prompting several schools in Central Oklahoma to transition to remote learning.

Gov. Kevin Stitt has resisted issuing a statewide face mask mandate despite several leading medical officials in the state calling for him to enact such a mandate to slow COVID’s surge and minimize the numbers of deaths caused by the virus.

“We can continue to go along and just keep waiting and hoping that we get a vaccine out, or we can do more aggressive things to slow the spread of the disease and to save people’s lives,” Dr. Dale Bratzler, the University of Oklahoma’s Chief COVID Officer, previously said.

This electron microscope image made available and color-enhanced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Integrated Research Facility in Fort Detrick, Md., shows Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, orange, isolated from a patient. University of Hong Kong scientists claim to have the first evidence of someone being reinfected with the virus that causes COVID-19. They said Monday, Aug. 24, 2020 that genetic tests show a 33-year-old man returning to Hong Kong from a trip to Spain in mid-August had a different strain of the coronavirus than the one he’d previously been infected with in March. (NIAID/National Institutes of Health via AP)
(NIAID/National Institutes of Health via AP)

Although the CDC recommends patients be tested twice to determine if they have recovered, health department officials say they are preserving tests for patients who are sick.

Instead, the Oklahoma State Department of Health identifies a person as recovered if they are currently not hospitalized or deceased and it has been 14 days since the onset of their symptoms or since they were diagnosed.

State officials urge Oklahomans to stay away from ill patients and to frequently wash their hands. Also, avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

At this point, Americans are urged to practice ‘social distancing’ by staying in their homes as much as possible and not going out into a crowd.

The virus is mainly spread from person-to-person, and symptoms usually appear two to 14 days after exposure. Officials stress that the most common symptoms are fever, cough, and shortness of breath.

If you do become sick, you are asked to stay away from others. If you have been in an area where the coronavirus is known to be spreading or been around a COVID-19 patient and develop symptoms, you are asked to call your doctor ahead of time and warn them that you might have been exposed to the virus. That way, experts say, they have the ability to take extra precautions to protect staff and other patients.

Continued Coronavirus Coverage

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