Clarification: The charges against one of the coaches in connection with the case have been updated and clarified.

KINGFISHER, Okla. (KFOR) – A federal investigation unveiled new allegations centering around the Kingfisher High School football program. The details in the lawsuit, which is pending in Oklahoma City federal court, alleges a hazing and bullying culture within the Kingfisher football program as well as mental and physical child abuse. The details in the lawsuit come with a trigger warning due to their graphic nature.

The documents reveal a variety of abusive situations, allegedly with the coach’s full knowledge. Among the allegations are that one player was whipped by sometimes knotted and wet, frayed towels while in the shower. The documents state sometimes the beatings would only stop when he “began to bleed.”

The player was also allegedly tased at least four times and was shot with a paintball gun at close range in the locker room. The lawsuit claims the coaches and other players laughed and didn’t discipline the attackers. The victim was left with welts and in pain. At times he was also sent threatening messages from other players. In the messages from the documents one player told him not to show up to practice and encouraged him to commit suicide. The player was told by another teammate that his mom would be killed if he told her about the abuse.

The lawsuit also details sexual assaults in the locker room. There were claims that coaches forced players into locker room fights that they would sometimes bet on as well.

We first brought you allegations into this program about two years ago.

“They said that he was being too big of a p**** and he needed to toughen up,” an anonymous parent told KFOR in August of 2020.

Photo goes with story
Injuries allegedly suffered by a Kingfisher student while participating in the high school’s football program. Image from the federal lawsuit.

That statement is from a parent whose son allegedly had to help another player off the field during a so-called drill called “King of the Ring” (aka bull in the ring).

“For ten minutes, they went at this boy,” the parent said.

“It was alleged that he was down on the ground and repeatedly,” said Kingfisher Police Chief David Catron in August of 2020. “Players were called in to make contact with him while he was still in a down position.”

Criminal charges were filed against a coach for obstructing an officer.

Coach Micah Ryan Nall pleaded guilty to willfully obstructing and delaying a police officer investigating the abuse charges.

Nall received a one year deferred sentence and a fine of $200. Nall also agreed not to coach any public or private school-sponsored sport for one year. That year is up in May.

We reached out to the attorney’s defending the district and we did not hear back. We only heard back from one of the coach’s attorneys who said his client is denying any wrongdoing. His full statement can be read below:

“In response to your inquiry about the John Doe federal lawsuit, my client Micah Nall, denies any wrongdoing, looks forward to defending himself against the allegations and I would refer you to review his detailed answer filed in the federal case where the substantive claims and assertions against him are denied and his defenses have been asserted.”

MARK RAINS, ATTORNEY FOR MICAH NALL

The Oklahoma State Department of Education is investigating as well. A statement from Supt. Joy Hofmeister can be read below:

“The reports of abuse are deeply troubling. A culture that enables it cannot be tolerated. Parents have a right to expect their children to be protected at school and in athletics. Stepping forward to report injury and abuse isn’t easy and takes courage. These are serious claims, and we are investigating thoroughly.”

JOY HOFMEISTER, STATE SUPERINTENDENT

The attorney for the child and his family responded to us via email and said they could not grant an interview at this time, but did provide information, some of which is already listed in this story. A status and scheduling conference is set for April 6.