Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics agents seize $250,000 worth of Fentanyl

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OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (KFOR) – The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics said 7,900 fake Oxycodone pills, laced with deadly fentanyl, are now off the streets. The OBN said the suspect also had 1,000 Percocet pills and a gun during the bust.

“Whether you’re a user or a dealer, you don’t know what’s in it,” said Mark Woodward with the Bureau. “One of those 7,900 pills could’ve killed someone.”

The OBN said Glenvert Jones Jr. was arrested while leaving his apartment to sell the pills after just receiving the massive shipment of drugs. The bureau identified the 28-year-old as a “Major Trafficker.”

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Glenvert Jones Jr.

The investigation of the ongoing problem has been linked to 24 deaths over the last 15 months. So far, nine people have been charged in the case.

“A lot of the dealers themselves do not realize, ‘I’m no longer selling oxycodone. My dealer is getting me fentanyl that looks like oxycodone pills,’” said Woodward.

Woodward said many victims are opioid addicts needing a fix after being cut off from their doctors, not knowing drug makers are upping their amount of product by pumping the pills full of cheap fentanyl.

“It can be as strong as oxycodone or heroine. It can be 100 times stronger and it can be 1,000 or 10,000 times stronger depending on how it’s made,” said the OBN Spokesperson.

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Fake oxycodone pills laced with Fentanyl.

“They’re getting something much stronger than what they’re anticipating. [They] take too much and just die,” said Dr. Melinda Cail, a family doctor.

Dr. Cail said Fentanyl was made as a pain killer for cancer patients with uncontrollable pain. The user’s lungs can collapse after swallowing the fake pill.

“They just stop getting the message to breathe,” said the doctor. “They suffocate for no reason.”

The OBN and Dr. Cail said the tragedy can happen to anyone.

“It does not matter how nice you are, how much you go to church or how good your intentions are, if you take an opioid or a narcotic medicine long enough, you will get addicted,” she said.

The OBN said they’re not sure if Jones is connected to any overdose deaths. So far, he has not been cooperating with officers.

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