Oklahoma’s COVID-19 cases climb by 2,600, deaths jump by 55

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OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – Health officials in Oklahoma say 55 additional Oklahomans have passed away from COVID-19.

On Thursday, data from the Oklahoma State Department of Health shows that the state has had 363,046 confirmed cases of COVID-19 since March.

That’s an increase of 2,686 cases or a 0.7% increase.

There were 55 additional deaths caused by the virus, bringing the state’s total number of deaths to 3,140.

Following a recent decrease in COVID-19 cases, Oklahoma State Commissioner of Health Dr. Lance Frye released this statement:

“The COVID-19 case numbers have been significantly lower this week, which prompted us to investigate their validity as well as our reporting systems out of an abundance of caution. After checking with staff and comparing different sources of information, we can report the data is accurate and our case count has been significantly down this week. This is great news for our state, and follows a trend of decreased cases we are seeing broadly nationwide. We are hopeful this trend will continue and are cautiously optimistic. I want to thank Oklahomans for continuing to be vigilant in taking precautions to safeguard yourself and those around you, including wearing a mask, watching your distance and washing your hands. 

In addition, hospitalizations statewide are trending down, which we know is a much-needed respite for our health care workers on the frontlines. We are also encouraged with our vaccine rollout strategy and implementation and ask Oklahomans to continue to be patient as we get our most at-risk populations vaccinated as quickly as possible.

As always, we will continue to monitor our data and state trends with the hope that our cases will continue to decrease and are committed to sharing that information in a timely and transparent manner with all Oklahomans.”

Oklahoma State Commissioner of Health Dr. Lance Frye
Medical staff attending to patients with COVID-19 wear protective equipment in a unit dedicated to treatment of the coronavirus at UW Health in Madison, Wis. Conditions inside the nation’s hospitals are deteriorating by the day as the coronavirus rages through the country at an unrelenting pace. (John Hart/Wisconsin State Journal via AP, File)
Medical staff attending to patients with COVID-19 wear protective equipment in a unit dedicated to treatment of the coronavirus at UW Health in Madison, Wis. Conditions inside the nation’s hospitals are deteriorating by the day as the coronavirus rages through the country at an unrelenting pace. (John Hart/Wisconsin State Journal via AP, File)

Right now, officials say there are 1,722 people in Oklahoma hospitals with a confirmed case of COVID-19.

Here is the breakdown of COVID-19 cases in Oklahoma counties:

  • Adair: 2,594 (18 deaths) (2,194 recovered)
  • Alfalfa: 1,049 (5 deaths) (981 recovered)
  • Atoka: 1,574 (8 deaths) (1,449 recovered)
  • Beaver: 355 (3 deaths) (334 recovered)
  • Beckham: 2,347 (27 deaths) (2,153 recovered)
  • Blaine: 811 (5 deaths) (743 recovered)
  • Bryan: 4,945 (44 deaths) (4,371 recovered)
  • Caddo: 3,365 (44 deaths) (3,034 recovered)
  • Canadian: 13,384 (59 deaths) (12,406 recovered)
  • Carter: 4,568 (21 deaths) (3,894 recovered)
  • Cherokee: 4,792 (27 deaths) (4,201 recovered)
  • Choctaw: 1,362 (9 deaths) (1,230 recovered)
  • Cimarron: 114 (1 death) (105 recovered)
  • Cleveland: 24,249 (194 deaths) (21,617 recovered)
  • Coal: 588 (8 deaths) (536 recovered)
  • Comanche: 8,980 (95 deaths) (7,974 recovered)
  • Cotton: 543 (13 deaths) (460 recovered)
  • Craig: 1,733 (8 deaths) (1,584 recovered)
  • Creek: 5,302 (81 deaths) (4,662 recovered)
  • Custer: 3,582 (44 deaths) (3,350 recovered)
  • Delaware: 3,842 (52 deaths) (3,421 recovered)
  • Dewey: 485 (4 deaths) (455 recovered)
  • Ellis: 331 (1 death) (310 recovered)
  • Garfield: 6,447 (55 deaths) (5,965 recovered)
  • Garvin: 2,999 (24 deaths) (2,673 recovered)
  • Grady: 4,920 (49 deaths) (4,487 recovered)
  • Grant: 463 (5 deaths) (425 recovered)
  • Greer: 440 (10 deaths) (403 recovered)
  • Harmon: 249 (1 death) (232 recovered)
  • Harper: 382 (3 deaths) (359 recovered)
  • Haskell: 1,072 (7 deaths) (942 recovered)
  • Hughes: 1,008 (12 deaths) (874 recovered)
  • Jackson: 2,622 (40 deaths) (2,424 recovered)
  • Jefferson: 592 (6 deaths) (530 recovered)
  • Johnston: 1,117 (12 deaths) (977 recovered)
  • Kay: 4,363 (51 deaths) (3,887 recovered)
  • Kingfisher: 1,762 (16 deaths) (1,617 recovered)
  • Kiowa: 668 (12 deaths) (597 recovered)
  • Latimer: 685 (7 deaths) (610 recovered)
  • Le Flore: 4,565 (36 deaths) (4,163 recovered)
  • Lincoln: 2,631 (38 deaths) (2,378 recovered)
  • Logan: 3,374 (17 deaths) (2,981 recovered)
  • Love: 1,254 (8 deaths) (1,111 recovered)
  • Major: 840 (4 deaths) (769 recovered)
  • Marshall: 1,565 (10 deaths) (1,376 recovered)
  • Mayes: 3,314 (29 deaths) (2,872 recovered)
  • McClain: 4,398 (36 deaths) (3,960 recovered)
  • McCurtain: 3,311 (57 deaths) (3,007 recovered)
  • McIntosh: 1,678 (24 deaths) (1,468 recovered)
  • Murray: 1,596 (14 deaths) (1,389 recovered)
  • Muskogee: 7,994 (65 deaths) (7,088 recovered)
  • Noble: 1,176 (8 deaths) (1,076 recovered)
  • Nowata: 928 (12 deaths) (810 recovered)
  • Okfuskee: 1,604 (16 deaths) (1,474 recovered)
  • Oklahoma: 70,543 (519 deaths) (63,960 recovered)
  • Okmulgee: 3,147 (35 deaths) (2,863 recovered)
  • Osage: 3,795 (35 deaths) (3,417 recovered)
  • Other: 143 (99 recovered)
  • Ottawa: 3,270 (33 deaths) (3,013 recovered)
  • Pawnee: 1,379 (18 deaths) (1,217 recovered)
  • Payne: 7,304 (38 deaths) (6,732 recovered)
  • Pittsburg: 3,825 (27 deaths) (3,458 recovered)
  • Pontotoc: 4,049 (36 deaths) (3,588 recovered)
  • Pottawatomie: 6,780 (48 deaths) (6,254 recovered)
  • Pushmataha: 853 (8 deaths) (779 recovered)
  • Roger Mills: 352 (6 deaths) (286 recovered)
  • Rogers: 8,403 (92 deaths) (7,544 recovered)
  • Seminole: 2,312 (25 deaths) (2,065 recovered)
  • Sequoyah: 3,317 (23 deaths) (2,938 recovered)
  • Stephens: 3,924 (38 deaths) (3,550 recovered)
  • Texas: 3,262 (18 deaths) (3,109 recovered)
  • Tillman: 661 (13 deaths) (597 recovered)
  • Tulsa: 59,629 (518 deaths) (53,657 recovered)
  • Wagoner: 6,352 (64 deaths) (5,534 recovered)
  • Washington: 3,909 (69 deaths) (3,474 recovered)
  • Washita: 948 (5 deaths) (875 recovered)
  • Woods: 1,113 (5 deaths) (1,048 recovered)
  • Woodward: 2,864 (12 deaths) (2,690 recovered)
A Nevada man was hospitalized after testing positive for COVID-19 a second time.
A Nevada man was hospitalized after testing positive for COVID-19 a second time.

In all, officials believe there are 32,771 active cases of COVID-19 across Oklahoma.

According to health department data on Thursday, officials believe 327,135 Oklahomans have recovered from the virus.

Although the CDC recommends patients be tested twice to determine if they have recovered, health department officials say they are preserving tests for patients who are sick.

Instead, the Oklahoma State Department of Health identifies a person as recovered if they are currently not hospitalized or deceased and it has been 14 days since the onset of their symptoms or since they were diagnosed.

This electron microscope image made available and color-enhanced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Integrated Research Facility in Fort Detrick, Md., shows Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, orange, isolated from a patient. University of Hong Kong scientists claim to have the first evidence of someone being reinfected with the virus that causes COVID-19. They said Monday, Aug. 24, 2020 that genetic tests show a 33-year-old man returning to Hong Kong from a trip to Spain in mid-August had a different strain of the coronavirus than the one he’d previously been infected with in March. (NIAID/National Institutes of Health via AP)
(NIAID/National Institutes of Health via AP)

State officials urge Oklahomans to stay away from ill patients and to frequently wash their hands. Also, avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

At this point, Americans are urged to practice ‘social distancing’ by staying in their homes as much as possible and not going out into a crowd.

The virus is mainly spread from person-to-person, and symptoms usually appear two to 14 days after exposure. Officials stress that the most common symptoms are fever, cough, and shortness of breath.

If you do become sick, you are asked to stay away from others. If you have been in an area where the coronavirus is known to be spreading or been around a COVID-19 patient and develop symptoms, you are asked to call your doctor ahead of time and warn them that you might have been exposed to the virus. That way, experts say, they have the ability to take extra precautions to protect staff and other patients.

Face masks
Via Unsplash

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