Members of Tulsa mass graves oversight committee asking for search to be expanded

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TULSA, Okla. – The search for possible mass graves of Tulsa Race Massacre victims is expected to continue Wednesday, but some members of the oversight committee are asking for the search to be expanded.

The Oklahoma Archeological Survey began subsurface scanning Monday afternoon in Oaklawn Cemetery in north Tulsa and is expected to finish Thursday. Crews will then move on to other sites.

The process often called “ground-penetrating radar” is being used in the search for victims of the 1921 massacre that left as many as 300 dead on Tulsa’s Black Wall Street.

The cemetery is one of four sites being examined under an October declaration by Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum. Crews will also search Newblock Park, an additional area near Newblock Park and the Rolling Oaks Memorial Gardens.

Bynum has said today’s technology “is light years” ahead of what was available 20 years ago when a search of the sites was led by what was known as the Tulsa Race Riot Commission.

KJRH reports some members of the Tulsa Mass Graves Investigation Public Oversight Committee would like researchers to look under the Inner Dispersal Loop and other areas of the cemetery.

So far, the search has been inconclusive.

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