STILLWATER, Okla. (KFOR) – You’ll never forget where you were 21 years ago today when our country experienced the most violent act of terrorism the world has ever seen. It took the lives of thousands of innocent people and first responders.  

In honor of 9/11, over 150 people participated in the annual memorial stair climb at Oklahoma State University today.  

Oklahoma State University students and several others reenacted the climb that first responders made in the Twin Towers on 9/11. 

The highest floor that was reached was 110, and that’s the number of floors climbed today OSU’s campus.  

“This is ongoing memorial, not just for those that died that day, but for all of the responders that have died since from World Trade Center with the lung disease related to the response efforts,” said Rob Agnew, associate professor of fire protection and safety engineering at Oklahoma State University. 

There were around 170 registered climbers Sunday. Climbers included active firefighters, law enforcement members, and many students.  

“We said we’re not going to forget. And so, this is part of that tradition of not forgetting what happened, the sacrifices that were made. And so, each year this tradition continues. We want to make sure that we don’t forget what happened,” said Agnew.  

It was Reese Roth’s first time stepping into this experience.  

“I wanted to feel what the guys who before me went through. Sort of get a taste of it anyway. And, I’ve got a younger brother who wasn’t even born on 9/11, and I wanted to bring him out here and experience a little bit of what that sacrifice looks like and what that means,” said Reese Roth, Enid firefighter.  

This is Andrew Hart’s third time participating in the stair climb at OSU.  

“The reason we do this is to remember those who lost their lives on 9/11 and even those who, you know, you didn’t know who survived, but still honor those brave men and women,” said Andrew Hart, president of firefighter challenge team at OSU. 

Hart plans on climbing every year until he can’t walk anymore.  

“Going through this, it’s very humbling. It’s you know, very fortunate to be here thanks to a lot of men and women. It’s a lot of chills,” said Hart. 
 
For one observer, she’s there to support climbers.  

“I think it’s important to, just really remember and commemorate the people that were lost during the 911 attack,” said Bella Vu, OSU student and member of the firefighter combat challenge. 

Sunday, we remember and never forget the 2,977 innocent people and first responders who were killed in the World Trade Center.