New study claims more than 100 common medications could lead to dementia, brain shrinkage

News
This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Oklahoma City ranks tenth worst for allergies out of a list of 100 cities, according to Live Science.

That’s a lot of allergy medication.

Now a new study printed in the Journal of the American Medical Association Neurology claims many over-the-counter and prescription drugs can lead to an increased risk of dementia.

The study involves not only allergy medications, but more than 100  anticholinergic drugs, which include drugs to treat a wide range of health issues, with common medicines such as Benadryl, Demerol, Dimetapp, Dramamine, Paxil, and Unisom.

Click here to see a complete list of the medications studied.

As part of the long-term study, researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine studied 451 people in their early 70s.

According to CNN, scientists say that, over time, the 60 participants who were taking anticholinergic drugs showed smaller brain sizes and less brain function.

Those same participants were also shown to have larger cavities in their brains, and performed poorly on short-term memory tests and problem-solving.

Researchers used MRI scans, PET scans, as well as memory and cognitive tests to measure participants’ changes.

A separate 2013 study involving nearly 3,700 older adults, found that taking the medications for as few as 60 days in a row could alter brain function.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Latest News

More News

National News

More National

Washington D.C.

More Washington

Your Local Election HQ

More Your Local Election HQ

Daily Oklahoma Coronavirus Data

Contact In Your Corner Team

Latest News

More News

KFOR Digital Originals

More Digital Original

Popular

Follow @KFOR on Twitter

Border Report

More Border Report