Measure that allows homeschooled juniors to apply for OHLAP signed into law

Oklahoma Politics

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – A bill that allows high school juniors to enroll in the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program has been signed by Gov. Stitt.

OHLAP is a scholarship program that provides certain qualifying students free tuition to state colleges and universities.

The students must be an Oklahoma resident, have a federally adjusted annual gross family income of $55,000 or less, and enroll in OHLAP in the 8th, 9th, or 10th grade. 

However, Sen. David Bullard wrote Senate Bill 132 to expand the program by allowing homeschooled 16-year-olds or public and private school students to enroll as juniors.

“While some students know at a younger age that they want to go to college, for others it’s a decision made later in high school. OHLAP was created to ensure more students have the opportunity to get a college degree regardless of their financial situation, and Senate Bill 132 is an effort to help those students who decide to pursue a higher education their junior year,” Bullard said. “The program isn’t currently being fully utilized, so kids are missing out on this incredible scholarship opportunity, and we have to do all we can to make sure their dreams of getting a college degree come true.”

Around 30,000 high school students are currently enrolled in OHLAP and around 15,000 are attending college on an OHLAP scholarship.

The bill was signed into law by Gov. Stitt on Tuesday.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Latest News

More News

National News

More National

Washington D.C.

More Washington

Your Local Election HQ

More Your Local Election HQ

Daily Oklahoma Coronavirus Data

Contact In Your Corner Team

Latest News

More News

SCAN ME: KFOR App QR Code

image of QR Code

Download the NEW KFOR App!

Image of the KFOR app

KFOR Digital Originals

More Digital Original

Popular

Follow @KFOR on Twitter

Border Report

More Border Report