1 of 2 lawsuits to postpone President Trump’s rally in Tulsa over coronavirus concerns has been denied

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UPDATE: A lawsuit filed in Tulsa County District Court to postpone President Donald Trump’s rally in Tulsa on Saturday has been denied.

The court rejected attorney Clark Brewster’s lawsuit, stating, “Plaintiff’s request for expedited evidentiary hearing and temporary injunction are denied.”

Brewster filed the lawsuit in Tulsa County on Monday stating, “Despite this alarming uptick in COVID-19 infections in Tulsa County, ASM Global plans to host an event that will bring tens of thousands of people into an enclosed arena in downtown Tulsa on June 20, 2020, without putting precautions in place to prevent the spread of the virus.”

The lawsuit goes on to claim, “If ASM Global moves forward with the event without adequate review, planning, training, protective equipment, and safeguards, cases of COVID-19— and the unavoidable attendant deaths—will rise.”

Brewster’s attempt to postpone Trump’s rally was rejected, but another lawsuit was filed against the rally.

Paul Tay, a perennial political candidate, filed a petition with the Oklahoma Supreme Court Tuesday morning, asking Governor Kevin Stitt to consider the potential risks associated with a large indoor rally during a pandemic. 

Tulsa County had it’s highest single-day jump in coronavirus cases yet on Monday.

Original

TULSA, Okla. (KFOR) – With COVID-19 cases on the rise in Oklahoma, two lawsuits have been filed out of concern for President Trump’s upcoming rally in Tulsa. 

This comes as cases spike in that city and the director of Tulsa’s health department is urging caution. 

Attorney Clark Brewster filed a lawsuit in Tulsa County on Monday, stating, “Despite this alarming uptick in COVID-19 infections in Tulsa County, ASM Global plans to host an event that will bring tens of thousands of people into an enclosed arena in downtown Tulsa on June 20, 2020, without putting precautions in place to prevent the spread of the virus.”

The lawsuit goes on to claim, “If ASM Global moves forward with the event without adequate review, planning, training, protective equipment, and safeguards, cases of COVID-19— and the unavoidable attendant deaths—will rise.”

Paul Tay, a perennial political candidate, drove from Tulsa to Oklahoma City first thing in the morning Tuesday because he says time is running out.

Tay, a current Tulsa mayoral candidate, filed a petition with the Oklahoma Supreme Court asking Gov. Kevin Stitt to consider the potential risks associated with a large indoor rally during a pandemic. 

“Why can’t we hit the pause button for one week to look at the public health issues of this?” he said. 

Tay says he’s currently undecided on the upcoming presidential election, but admits he and Trump don’t always share the same politics. 

However, he says it’s not about that.

“Even if you are a Biden supporter, even if you don’t agree with what he’s saying right now – we can’t have the president go down,” he said. 

On Monday, Tulsa County had it’s highest single-day jump in coronavirus cases yet. Tulsa’s health department director shared his concerns. 

“Everybody should have a voice in the political process, but let’s lend our voices when it’s safer and right now in Tulsa based on the data and disease,” said Dr. Bruce Dart. 

Oklahoma’s GOP says the Trump Campaign will take temperatures at the door and offer hand sanitizer and masks for optional use.

“All of us being adults and respectful adults, will be able to manage themselves on when they feel they should have their mask on, and when they should take their mask off,” said Oklahoma GOP Chairmain David McLain. 

Trump tweeted Monday that the “Far Left Fake News Media” had no COVID problem with rioters and looters, but trying to shame the rallies won’t work.

His supporters are already lining up to make sure they get in and are unafraid.

“Absolutely not – there are rioting and protesting going on all over the United States,” said Tiffany Nixon, who was lined up at the BOK Center Monday.  “They are side-by-side, arm-to-arm. I have absolutely no fear of getting COVID at all whatsoever.”

But health officials say a large indoor gathering poses a greater risk.

 “That’s the perfect format for disease transmission,” said Dr. Dart. 

Governor Stitt’s office responded with this statement:

”Governor Stitt has reminded Oklahomans that COVID-19 is still in the United States and still in Oklahoma, and that it is important to continue to take precautions. The original public health measures were put in place to allow us time to build a robust testing and tracing infrastructure, hospital capacity and our PPE supply. The State has more than 80 free mobile testing sites in operation, has implemented a hospital surge plan that has expanded capacity by 40% and has acquired massive amounts of PPE for emergency support. Oklahoma has also prioritized data transparency to empower citizens, business leaders and elected officials across the state on how to make unique accommodations to protect vulnerable populations. Oklahoma is prepared to confront COVID-19 until a vaccine is developed.”

Baylee Lakey, Communications Director   

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