Psychologist: OSU homecoming parade suspect “incompetent,” “acutely psychotic”

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STILLWATER, Okla. - While the prosecution still waits for a mental evaluation of a woman accused of driving her car into a crowd of onlookers at a local homecoming parade, the defense has submitted their own competency report.

Authorities said 25-year-old Adacia Chambers drove her car into an unmanned police motorcycle before plowing straight into the crowd of onlookers during Oklahoma State’s homecoming parade on Oct. 24.

"It's one of those moments in history that we realize there are people out there that have problems," said Garvin Issacs, a legal expert.

In all, authorities said four people were killed and 46 others were injured in the crash.

Officials said 2-year-old Nash Lucas, 23-year-old Nikita Nakal, 65-year-old Dr. Marvin and Bonnie Stone were all killed in the crash.

On Wednesday, Chambers was officially charged with four counts of second-degree murder and 46 counts of felony assault.

Prosecutors are asking for a competency hearing, even though they believe Chambers was fully competent at the time of the crash.

A psyche evaluation may hold the answer to a criminal trial or a mental health institute.

"If they're mentally ill, they're out of touch with reality, they don't understand the nature, consequences of their actions," Issacs said.

On Wednesday afternoon, Chambers' attorney submitted a competency report of his own.

According to court documents filed by Tony Coleman, a forensic psychologist found Chambers "incompetent to undergo further proceedings" and determined that she was "acutely psychotic and in need of immediate psychiatric treatment."

Shawn Roberson, a forensic psychologist, said Chambers couldn't perform certain tests, because she didn't understand the exercise.

"I inquired where she believed she was at this time, and she replied 'Talking to Jesus. You are Jesus.' She acknowledged she was in 'a jail' but was unable to explain why, voicing 'to get out of jail.' I told Ms. Chambers this made little sense and asked her to explain, at which point she noted, 'He died for me, so we can be married,'" Roberson's report read.

"Psychosis is made up of two parts really, where you have delusions, which is where you are thinking things are happening that aren't or you have ideas in your head that are not necessarily true," said Traci Cook, director of Oklahoma National Alliance on Mental Illness. "Things to you and I that seem crazy, they don't make sense, but this is the illness. Your brain controls your thoughts. It controls your feelings. It controls your actions."

Roberson said he tried to determine if she could understand the charges against her.

"I asked how she came to learn about what had happened, and she illogically replied 'through being second best.' She was unable to repeat the accusations, instead claiming she was accused of 'some type of neglect, an unawareness of a need.' I educated her a third time about the pending accusations and asked her again just a short time later, but she irrelevantly responded that she was accused of 'ignorance and unknowing of my circumstance," the report went on to say.

Roberson said Chambers did not show any concern about being in custody or that she could spend most of her life behind bars.

Court records show that her emotional state "ranged for uncontrollable sobbing to inappropriate, hysterical laughter."

Roberson said that he does not believe that Chambers can help with her defense.

At one point, Chambers denied having a mental illness and claimed she "had no need for psychiatric treatment."

Roberson said Chambers did say she was very sleepy but said, "I didn't want to go away. I wanted to soak it in, so I chose not to sleep. It felt like there was a day or two or three nights where I chose not to sleep."

Court records show she also described feeling very connected with God.

When asked about where she lived, Chambers reportedly began talking about Jesus. 

"I think God had called me back because he was alone, but he wasn't alone and he realized it. So now we can be together."

"She then digressed into an explanation about how she was to marry 'Jesus' and 'God.' Shortly thereafter, she began crying hysterically, stating 'I miss Jesus,'" the report stated.

When asked why she had sought mental health treatment in the past, Chambers stated, "Because I felt something was wrong. I think God had called me back because he was alone, but he wasn't alone and he realized it. So, now, we can be together."

Court documents state, as Chambers was signing a release for her health records, she began laughing hysterically, saying, "My dad loves me very much. The date, it was just 15 and now it's 16. It's impossible not to be happy now."

When asked about the case, Chambers allegedly said she was not insane but would be found guilty "because I hadn't found God."

Roberson said that he is concerned that she could either harm herself or others if she is released without treatment.

"It is a brain disease," Cooke said. "We can't just get over it."

"Insanity is a defense to criminal charges to our judicial system and, when a person is insane, that person goes to a mental health facility for the protection of the public," Issacs said.

The psychologist who evaluated Chambers did say he believes with time, appropriate treatment and medication Chambers could become competent to assist with her defense.

Chambers remains behind bars, on a $1 million bond.

If convicted, she faces at least 10 years in prison for each of the four second-degree murder charges.

Her next court date is November 13th.

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