TULSA COUNTY, Okla. (KFOR) – An Oklahoma judge said six descendants of victims of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre cannot sue for reparations.

The order, signed Tuesday by Tulsa County District Judge Caroline Wall, allows three known survivors of the attack in which a white mob killed hundreds of Black people to move forward with the lawsuit.

Wall in May allowed the case to go forward while partially granting a motion to dismiss it without saying at the time what was being dismissed.

In addition to the six descendants, Wall dismissed as plaintiffs the Historic Vernon AME Church Inc., which did not exist in 1921, and The Tulsa African Ancestral Society, which represents other descendants.

The massacre happened when an angry white mob descended on a 35-block area in Tulsa’s Greenwood District, killing people and looting and burning businesses and homes. Thousands of people were left homeless and living in a hastily constructed internment camp.

The city and insurance companies never compensated victims for their losses, and the massacre ultimately resulted in racial and economic disparities that still exist today, the lawsuit claims. In the years following the massacre, according to the lawsuit, city and county officials actively thwarted the community’s effort to rebuild and neglected the Greenwood and predominantly Black north Tulsa community in favor of overwhelmingly white parts of Tulsa.